business threat assessment

Four Steps to Conduct a Business Threat Assessment

By | Emergency Management

If there’s one thing that is certain in business, it’s uncertainty. No matter how foolproof your project plan is, or how airtight your corporate strategy is, you will be forced to confront uncertain situations. To put it simply: you need to be ready for the wide array of threats that can impact operations and employee safety.

This is where business threat assessment comes in. Although you cannot predict which threats will impact your locations and assets, a business threat assessment ensures that you will be prepared for whichever threats do arise.

You can never completely eliminate risks and threats, but you can bring them to a level that is acceptable to your organization.

Here are the four steps your organization should take: Read More

OSHA violations

How to Prevent the Top 10 OSHA Violations

By | Safety and Security

Safety is the first priority for any company that seeks to protect employees and customers. Knowing the hazards that exist in workplace offices, equipment, and machinery is the first step toward preventing injury or even death.

The Occupational Safety and Health Organization (OSHA) publishes a list of its most frequently cited violations in the workplace. By examining this list, employers can analyze the dangers inherent in their workplaces and plan to avoid them. Each of these hazards may not apply to every business, so take an all hazards approach to plan for the primary risks facing your company. Read More

all hazards approach

Be Prepared for Anything: The All Hazards Approach

By | Emergency Management

The worst time to think about emergency planning is when the threat of an emergency looms over your business. When that happens, no business owner is glad they pushed off emergency planning “to Q1” or the hazy future: “We’ll get to that later.”

A better way for businesses to prepare is with the “all-hazards” approach to emergency planning. The all-hazards approach is defined by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services as an “integrated approach to emergency preparedness planning that focuses on capacities and capabilities that are critical to preparedness for a full spectrum of emergencies or disasters.” Read More

business traveler with safety app

What to Look for in a Business Travel Safety App

By | Safety and Security

On September 23, 2019, over 150,000 travelers found themselves stranded at airports across the world. Thomas Cook, Britain’s oldest and most well-known travel agency, had suddenly gone out of business the night before—along with its fleet of 105 jets under the banner of Thomas Cook Airlines.

At midnight, the 178-year-old travel agency had failed to meet a deadline set by creditors and went into compulsory liquidation. Two minutes after midnight, its first jet to land was impounded at Manchester Airport. Many others would follow, at airports across the world. Read More

worker using communication software

5 Non-Emergency Uses For Your Notification System

By | Communications

When you hear the word “emergency,” what do you think of? Perhaps an active shooter in the workplace. Or an incoming Category 3 hurricane. Those types of emergencies—the ones that show up on any 24/7 news channel—are real and substantial risks that your organization needs to be prepared for.

From a business perspective, you need to broaden your perspective for what qualifies as an “emergency.” The reality is there are many threats to business continuity that will never show up on the news.

Consider the broad set of business-critical activities—and the ways your emergency communication system can help you keep them running smoothly. Read More

Are You Doing Enough to Keep Your Lone Workers Safe?

By | Safety and Security

Not every employee has the benefit of working with peers. Some are lone workers who do their jobs alone or with little interaction from coworkers. Contractors, field workers, home health care nurses, social workers, realtors and fleet drivers are just a few examples of lone workers. It is estimated that Canada, the United States and Europe have 53 million lone workers combined; approximately 15 percent of the overall workforce. IDC estimates 1.3 billion people are considered mobile workers, many of whom work alone all or part of their day. Read More

business travel in the winter

How to Manage Business Travel Risks in the Winter

By | Safety and Security

The scene is all too familiar to most business travelers. You’re sitting at the airport gate, not sure whether it’s worth pulling out your laptop again. Your flight’s been delayed by an hour at this point. The last update from the gate agent said the flight would be leaving any minute now, but you doubt it. The plane hasn’t even arrived at the gate yet. You’re not sure whether to reschedule meetings the next day and book another night at a hotel, or if you should wait it out.

This is any business traveler’s worst nightmare. During the winter—when blizzards and high winds make travel even more unpredictable—this scenario is all too common.

This blog will examine business travel risks in the winter—plus what you can do about those threats. By taking a few specific steps, you can minimize the headache for your employees and maximize your business efficiency. Read More

winter hazards

The Many Hazards of Winter Weather To Businesses

By | Safety and Security

Winter conjures up images of gently falling snow, cozy indoor gatherings, and a parade of holidays. But the advent of winter also brings up a more ominous association: the hazards that can impact any business due to extreme winter weather. The CDC reports that winter cold kills more than twice as many Americans as summer heat. Businesses in different climates might face various levels of winter intensity, but an all-hazards approach should take into account these hazards for most businesses. Read More

emergency weather alerts for corporate travelers

Keep Traveling Employees Safe with Emergency Weather Alerts

By | Safety and Security

No one ever plans to be stranded in a snowstorm or threatened by a hurricane. Despite predictions by meteorologists, weather seems to have a mind of its own. Due to the unpredictability of mother nature, you must be prepared to react quickly when bad weather strikes. This becomes especially challenging when you are dealing with business travelers–who are likely traveling to a location with completely different weather threats than their your primary office. By equipping traveling employees with emergency weather alerts, you can ensure that they have the most up to date information available. Read More